63. Is the pursuit of money worthwhile?

Here is the very unfair thing about money: If you have money, it’s easy to gain more. If you don’t have any, it’s hard to gain any.

I recently read John Green’s essay about Monopoly from The Anthropocene Reviewed. He talks about the unfairness of Monopoly and how it relates to the unfairness of life. Once you have Monopolies, you just get richer and richer until you push people out of the game.

And once you get rich in real life, it’s really easy to get richer and richer. When you have enough capital, you start investing that, and you get more capital to invest even more.

When you have a really good resume, you can leave one high-paying job and get an even more high-paying job.

And when you haven’t been making money and you don’t have very much money in your bank account, it’s really hard to get started.

In our recent house renovations, we have drained out our savings of the last 10 years as we’ve poured our time and resources into our home. It gets a bit stressful sometimes as we try to avoid debt (though we have a home equity line of credit as a contingency).

Most people would like more money, even if it wouldn’t necessarily make them happier.

I have a hard time pursuing after extra money; it’s just not a great motivator for me. But for some people, they spend their whole lives trying to get more and more.

But money is only good as a means to an end, not an end itself.

So why are you pursuing money? To live a richer life? To help others? To worry and stress less? To save up for large projects? To provide for your family?

The reasons matter.